Manfred Touron

Berty Technologies 🚀

Non-profit organization behind the Berty project.

12 pages about "Berty Technologies 🚀"

OSMOSE Hackathon 20/21 april, 2019

Few days ago, I organised and hosted a Hackathon at Berty.

Two days of code and startup-design with friends, a new network, new opportunities, new ideas, and a lot of fun.

Who

  • Berty (me)
  • Osmose (Zooma & Zaraki)
  • La suite du monde (Adrien)
  • Busy (Ekitcho)
  • Independants (Loup, Norman)

Topics

  • Projects presentations
  • Discuss about “how to work together”
  • Focus on code

What we’ve done

  • Meet people
    • New friends
    • New colleagues ? :)
  • Refactor if the web radio of Osmose / La suite du monde
    • Using with Liquidsoap, Docker, Icecast, Golang
    • Plan to plug it with Discord / Telegram to interact with users
  • Automate “La suite du monde” processes (onboarding, federation, delegation, scouting, etc…)
    • With Airtable, Zapier, custom scripts
    • Leboncoin / Seloger scraping with Scrapy (Python)
  • Discussions about Blockchain
    • General discussions to raise the knowledge of everyone
    • Main net / Test net / Token Economy
    • Comparisons
    • Features planning
    • Blockchain-based project architectures
    • DPOS strategy for Berty
    • La suite du monde strategy
    • Osmose strategy
    • Busy strategy
    • Blockchains comparisons
  • Architecture of an event ticketing & wallet system based on the blockchain
  • Fun
    • Blobby Volley, Jackbox
    • Nom nom nom
    • IRL Cryptography/Steganography game (fake telepathy)

10 Minutes to get a job - mindmap-based live presentation 🕙

10 minutes to get a job, by 42

42 recently launched a series of conferences named “10 Minutes to get a job”, the title is a little bit counter-intuitive, because, the 10 minutes hard-limit is for the organization presenting its activities; the students have all the time they need after the presentations, with some fresh foods and drinks.

10 minutes to get a job, by 42born2code

This series of conferences is very successful, a lot of students looking for a job (or just curious) are coming in the room for the presentation, and a lot more are coming for the buffet after (not sure about the motivation for these ones). 😄

Berty’s first public presentation

It was something totally new for the Berty team, the first time we talk about the project publicly, and as the project is still under development, we selected pieces of information that can be shared and that are is relevant and “sexy” for the students.

With the constraints of “10 minutes”, we made the choice of using preparing a mind-map with facts, no phrases, no images, and then I made the presentation by going word by word, and by expanding each mind-map folder’s.

It’s a little bit more complicated than a more standard conference, as I have to concurrently speak at the microphone, read the slide, move the zoomed map, expand folders, and everything in less than 10 minutes. Luckily, I made it in 9:55s and the organizer allowed one question from the audience.

The setup behind Berty's mindmap-based presentation

The cool thing about this mind-map based conference is that at the end, there is only one slide, containing all the pieces of information and that everyone physically (and intellectually) present at that time should be able to explain again.

One slide is practical to capture with a smartphone, and this slide contains everything; this advantage is really cool and I think that I will use this technique again when I don’t need to focus on a specific topic.

Berty's mind-map based presentation

Improvements

I was very concentrated with the data that I totally forgot a lot of details :)

Personal notes for later:

  • Put at least my name, somewhere on the slide :)
  • Say who I am when I start talking
  • Don’t forget to add contact instructions

The buffet

I met 15 students, and my colleagues, Alex and Gody also met additional ones.

I was really happy to receive feedbacks from the students about the effectiveness of this style of presentation.

It was straight to the point, I like it

or

It was intense, I received a lot of motivational information, I want to know more now

My colleagues told me that a student asked her:

How are you so much energized, it’s impressive to feel so much energy

After the event

I made a lot of mistakes during the presentation and the preparation, but we also made some after :)

First, we forgot to create a job’s specific email address, it was fastly fixed, and the dedicated address (42@berty.tech) was shared to the students by the 42 staff (thank you Virginie!).

Why we attended this event?

Technically, we are not in the hurry of hiring anyone, but Alex and I, recently finished to read “Who”, and we decided to follow the concept of meeting people continuously, maintain a list of people with their talents, and contact them the day we are in the hurry of hiring someone.


Who: The A Method for Hiring

Geoff Smart, Randy Street


Additionally, we are also open to “the perfect match”, and last but not least, I’m often solicited by other friends and CEOs of the startups I audit, so it’s always useful to take some time to meet motivated students, speak with them,

Berty’s scorecards

Even if we are not actively looking for a position, we made the exercise of defining what kind of profile would make the difference enough to hire someone right now.

We formatted our job offers as “Scorecards”, which is the method suggested in “Who”.

See Berty’s Scorecards (work-in-progress).

Why You Should Stop Saying You Have Nothing To Hide!

📷 Adapted from Nathaniel Dahan

And why it’s not OK being watched.

So you are being watched online. Why should you care? After all, you are doing nothing wrong. You have nothing to hide, right? You just go online to chat with your friends, maybe argue with strangers, and life moves on! Should it really be a concern that the government and other parties are spying on you, gathering valuable information? That there are data aggregators building a nice (or not so nice 😅) profile of you to sell to the highest bidder? What of state agencies, travel companies, telecommunication giants, marketing agencies, advertising companies and insurance providers all clamoring for the personal data used not only to sell to you but sell you as well?

Your privacy is a precious commodity. You should care about your online conversations even if they’re just about making plans with your best friend or reassuring your mom you are eating right.

1) Do you really think you have nothing to hide?

  • Would you be willing to hand over your phone and give me your PIN?
  • Would you be willing to let your postman open your mail and make a copy of it?

Do you still think you have nothing to hide? Be honest; It will be quite embarrassing even if you really ‘have nothing to hide’ - simply because it’s your right to have your own space and self-freedom.

Strangely, if I replied, “I do have things to hide”, most people would stare at me and reply “are you a terrorist?”. Does it mean only terrorists have things to hide? Of course not. Everyone needs protection and privacy, no matter what the subject is about.

Maybe it’s because we all have a different definition of our privacy? Privacy is a hard concept to define, and it can not be reduced to a simple sentence or concept. For instance, the shortest definition I found online is: “privacy is a state in which one is not observed or disturbed by other people”. But, privacy is much more complex than just not being observed. It involves the right to personal space, the control over information, identity, intimacy… and other aspects of life!

“Privacy, in other words, involves so many things that it is impossible to reduce them all to one simple idea. And we need not do so.” – Daniel J. Solove

Maybe it’s because we all have a different definition of our personal information. When someone declares he or she has nothing to hide, maybe it refers to the type of data the government typically collects? Even in this case, it’s inaccurate to declare I have nothing to hide. Why? Because no one is perfect, we are human beings, and human beings break the rules. Whether it’s hosting a poker night at home, not reporting those 20 dollars you found on the ground, or even jay-walking, we’ve all done something.

Maybe it’s hard for people to identify that they are an object of surveillance. Of course, you’re not going to receive a text message: “hello we are spying on you in order to sell your data to your insurance company”. When it comes to discrete actions: the less you see, the less you care.

Maybe you do have something to hide, but you just aren’t aware. If you live in the US, I am pretty sure that the federal government could find something you’ve done which violates a provision in the 27,000 pages of federal statutes or 10,000 administrative regulations - if they had access to every email you’ve ever written or every phone call you’ve ever made.

There are many reasons to care about your privacy in this age of online communication and data transfer. Here are some:

Privacy is a right that has been fought for. People in history fought for this, and it is important not to take privacy for granted. Even better is recognizing that there are countries under tyranny whose people have not yet attained this right to privacy. Like other rights, privacy is a right that has not always been around and therefore, like any other right it should be protected.

There is a difference between privacy and secrecy. When people say ‘they have nothing to hide’ as the reason why they don’t care about privacy, what they are really doing is confusing privacy with secrecy. You may not want someone to actively read your emails, or read your messages, or scroll through your pictures. This is not because you have something to hide but because you want the right to have your private information private. It shouldn’t be any different when you hear of the government’s mass surveillance and laws and actions to curtail internet freedom and privacy.

Your information will likely fall Into the wrong hands. While you may feel like you don’t have anything to hide from government agencies for ‘security’ purposes, you might be however alarmed to know that your information could fall into the hands of hackers, blackmailers, data aggregators and others who may be hell-bent on exploiting this data. Remember Equifax, Ashley Madison and Yahoo breaches? Being blasé about your privacy could mean courting trouble.

There is uncertainty how the information you share now will evolve in the future. Your private communication and information exposed to the world in an out-of-context manner can also be used against you. While you currently may not have a lot to risk if your data is shared, this can change in the future where your personal data can be misrepresented to the detriment of your career or social life. Politicians are constantly bombarded with their personal information exploited, speeches manipulated, and pictures were taken out of context.

2) How much is your data?

When you put tons of personal information online using Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, you have an instant benefit; it’s easy to use and free. So, it’s pretty tricky to balance with something that might be dangerous in a hard to predict future. But, those services aren’t entirely free, we’re paying with our data, after all.

Do you wonder what tech companies and telecommunication giants gain from allowing you to transfer or store unlimited data in their servers for free? Are they philanthropists? No, they are not, they are the wealthiest companies on earth. Google is not a search company; it’s a data company. The lack of privacy enriches corporations.

‘If You Have Something You Don’t Want Anyone To Know, Maybe You Shouldn’t Be Doing It’ - Eric Schmidt, Google CEO

This is because if you’re not paying for it, you become the product. Or rather, your ‘private’ information is. It is sold to interested parties such as advertising companies without your say-so. Thus gaining these companies riches and a reluctance to enforce privacy. You should, therefore, be very concerned!

3) Why is being spied on not ok?

📷 Photo by Sweet Ice Cream Photography

I still wonder why we came to this “nothing to hide / I do not care about my privacy” argument. An interesting theory called The Internet’s Original Sin argue that people want to use internet for free so corporate companies start to experiment to make money using the data they had collected on the users and realized that was quite valuable in the context of advertising. Later on, governments find out that those companies have all the data they needed and start collecting them.

“Ask yourself: at every point in history, who suffers the most from unjustified surveillance? It is not the privileged, but the vulnerable. Surveillance is not about safety, it’s about power. It’s about control.” - Ed Snowden

Authorities made this acceptable and normal to most of us. How have they done this? They used the scapegoat of stopping terrorism or other illegal stuff. But, are we all terrorists? Terrorists didn’t wait for the government to cipher their messages. So why is it so legitimate to spy on honest citizens? To my humble opinion, the goal is right, but the method is wrong - and it’s too asymmetrical.

4- Conclusion

So, why it’s so important to care about our privacy when you aren’t a nonconformist? Naturally, because it’s part of our freedom. If we start to trim our privacy little by little, it will lead undeniably to a massive loss of our freedom. Mass surveillance and the reduction of our privacy is made to have a certain degree of social control - to turn individual to perfect subject of control and control has no limit except the one we accept. Is it the type of digital environment that we want?

If you have time (1h30), I recommend that you watch this wonderful online documentary: Nothing to hide

Cheers Internet, feel free to clap & follow our stories, see you next time. 🤫